Management of Atopic Hand Dermatitis

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

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Management of Atopic Hand Dermatitis. / Halling-Overgaard, Anne-Sofie; Zachariae, Claus; Thyssen, Jacob P.

In: Dermatologic Clinics, Vol. 35, No. 3, 2017, p. 365-372.

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Halling-Overgaard, A-S, Zachariae, C & Thyssen, JP 2017, 'Management of Atopic Hand Dermatitis', Dermatologic Clinics, vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 365-372. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.det.2017.02.010

APA

Halling-Overgaard, A-S., Zachariae, C., & Thyssen, J. P. (2017). Management of Atopic Hand Dermatitis. Dermatologic Clinics, 35(3), 365-372. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.det.2017.02.010

Vancouver

Halling-Overgaard A-S, Zachariae C, Thyssen JP. Management of Atopic Hand Dermatitis. Dermatologic Clinics. 2017;35(3):365-372. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.det.2017.02.010

Author

Halling-Overgaard, Anne-Sofie ; Zachariae, Claus ; Thyssen, Jacob P. / Management of Atopic Hand Dermatitis. In: Dermatologic Clinics. 2017 ; Vol. 35, No. 3. pp. 365-372.

Bibtex

@article{1053a813edee49ce8ff6619dab6089d0,
title = "Management of Atopic Hand Dermatitis",
abstract = "This article provides an overview of clinical aspects of hand eczema in patients with atopic dermatitis. Hand eczema can be a part of atopic dermatitis itself or a comorbidity, for example, as irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. When managing hand eczema, it is important to first categorize the subtype and identify potential culprit allergens or irritants. First-line therapy should be a combination of emollients and topical corticosteroids; possible alternatives include topical calcineurin inhibitors or coal tar. Second-line therapy includes UV therapy and systemic therapy, including azathioprine, cyclosporine, methotrexate, and mycophenolate. Prednisolone should only be very infrequently used.",
keywords = "Administration, Cutaneous, Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use, Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use, Calcineurin Inhibitors/therapeutic use, Coal Tar/therapeutic use, Comorbidity, Dermatitis, Atopic/epidemiology, Dermatologic Agents/therapeutic use, Eczema/classification, Emollients/therapeutic use, Hand Dermatoses/classification, Humans, Skin Physiological Phenomena, Ultraviolet Therapy",
author = "Anne-Sofie Halling-Overgaard and Claus Zachariae and Thyssen, {Jacob P}",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1016/j.det.2017.02.010",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "365--372",
journal = "Dermatologic Clinics",
issn = "0733-8635",
publisher = "W.B.Saunders Co.",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Management of Atopic Hand Dermatitis

AU - Halling-Overgaard, Anne-Sofie

AU - Zachariae, Claus

AU - Thyssen, Jacob P

N1 - Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - This article provides an overview of clinical aspects of hand eczema in patients with atopic dermatitis. Hand eczema can be a part of atopic dermatitis itself or a comorbidity, for example, as irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. When managing hand eczema, it is important to first categorize the subtype and identify potential culprit allergens or irritants. First-line therapy should be a combination of emollients and topical corticosteroids; possible alternatives include topical calcineurin inhibitors or coal tar. Second-line therapy includes UV therapy and systemic therapy, including azathioprine, cyclosporine, methotrexate, and mycophenolate. Prednisolone should only be very infrequently used.

AB - This article provides an overview of clinical aspects of hand eczema in patients with atopic dermatitis. Hand eczema can be a part of atopic dermatitis itself or a comorbidity, for example, as irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. When managing hand eczema, it is important to first categorize the subtype and identify potential culprit allergens or irritants. First-line therapy should be a combination of emollients and topical corticosteroids; possible alternatives include topical calcineurin inhibitors or coal tar. Second-line therapy includes UV therapy and systemic therapy, including azathioprine, cyclosporine, methotrexate, and mycophenolate. Prednisolone should only be very infrequently used.

KW - Administration, Cutaneous

KW - Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use

KW - Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use

KW - Calcineurin Inhibitors/therapeutic use

KW - Coal Tar/therapeutic use

KW - Comorbidity

KW - Dermatitis, Atopic/epidemiology

KW - Dermatologic Agents/therapeutic use

KW - Eczema/classification

KW - Emollients/therapeutic use

KW - Hand Dermatoses/classification

KW - Humans

KW - Skin Physiological Phenomena

KW - Ultraviolet Therapy

U2 - 10.1016/j.det.2017.02.010

DO - 10.1016/j.det.2017.02.010

M3 - Review

C2 - 28577805

VL - 35

SP - 365

EP - 372

JO - Dermatologic Clinics

JF - Dermatologic Clinics

SN - 0733-8635

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 194910551